Category Archives: Birthing Center

Birthing Center Wins March of Dimes Honor

Access-to-Care

March of Dimes’ Recognition Banner presented: Chris Parker, UM Shore Regional Health CNO and VP-Clinical Services, Ruth Ann Jones, director of Acute Care and Emergency Services, Wendy Jarrett community director, March of Dimes’ Eastern Shore Division,  Luanne Satchell, nurse manager, Women’s and Children’s Health Services, UM SRH; UM SRH; Jessica Hales, March of Dimes’ Eastern Shore Division; and Ken Kozel, president and CEO , UM SRH.

March of Dimes’ Recognition Banner presented: Chris Parker, UM Shore Regional Health CNO and VP-Clinical Services, Ruth Ann Jones, director of Acute Care and Emergency Services, Wendy Jarrett community director, March of Dimes’ Eastern Shore Division,  Luanne Satchell, nurse manager, Women’s and Children’s Health Services, UM SRH; Jessica Hales, March of Dimes’ Eastern Shore Division; and Ken Kozel, president and CEO , UM SRH.

University of Maryland Shore Regional Health was recognized in June 2015 with the presentation of a banner award, by the March of Dimes’ Maryland National Capitol Area Chapter and its partner entities, the Maryland Patient Safety Center, and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The award recognizes UM Shore Regional Health’s commitment to improving the quality of care for moms and babies and the great strides made by the Birthing Center at UM Shore Medical Center at Easton in reducing the rate of non-medically indicated deliveries prior to 39 weeks gestation.

The banner program is a component of the March of Dimes “Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait” campaign, which urges women to wait for labor to begin on its own if their pregnancy is healthy, rather than scheduling delivery before 39 completed weeks of pregnancy.

Premature births cost the U.S. more than $26 billion a year and take a high toll on families. Babies born just a few weeks early are at risk of severe health problems and lifelong disabilities, and premature birth is the leading cause of death of children under five years old.  While the national rate of elective pre-term births has been declining since 2006, the current 11.4 percent rate remains higher than that of most developed nations. March of Dimes’ goal is to reduce it to 5.5 percent by 2030.

To qualify for March of Dimes Banner Recognition, hospitals completed an application and provided the following: data for at least two consecutive quarters showing rate of elective pre-term deliveries below 5% for each quarter; a written policy regarding non-medically indicated deliveries less than 39 weeks gestation; and a description of the process for monitoring the rate of non-medically indicated deliveries less than 39 weeks. State-wide, 30 hospitals earned March of Dimes Banner Recognition this year.

“We are proud that our expert team has worked  to address this issue in our community and to establish policies to avoid scheduling deliveries before 39 weeks of pregnancy, except when medically necessary,” said Ruth Ann Jones, EdD, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, director of Acute Care and Emergency Services. “The Birthing Center multidisciplinary team has done an exemplary job in reducing early elective deliveries in order to provide the best care to our mothers and babies — truly Creating Healthier Communities Together.”

Birthing Center Team Attends Breastfeeding Conference

Pictured back row (left to right) are Priscilla Engle, RN; Jacalyn Bradley, RN; Lynn Crouch, RN; San¬dy Simmons, RN; Patty MacDougall, MSN, RNC, Manager, Women's & Children's Services; Vonnie Rosemary, RN: Karen Van Trieste, RN. Pictured front row are Connie Edwards, RN; Linda Warren, RN; Julie Callahan, RN; and Melissa Smith, RN.

Pictured back row (left to right) are Priscilla Engle, RN; Jacalyn Bradley, RN; Lynn Crouch, RN; San¬dy Simmons, RN; Patty MacDougall, MSN, RNC, Manager, Women’s & Children’s Services; Vonnie Rosemary, RN: Karen Van Trieste, RN. Pictured front row are Connie Edwards, RN; Linda Warren, RN; Julie Callahan, RN; and Melissa Smith, RN.

Members of the UM Shore Regional Health Birthing Center team recently traveled to Delaware to attend a conference focused on breastfeeding. Shore Regional Health’s Birthing Center at the UM Shore Medical Center at Easton delivers about 1,000 babies annually, but its services and care for new mothers continue during the days, weeks and even months following delivery. An important priority of the Birthing Center is to educate all new mothers under its care about the benefits and management of breastfeeding so that they have the knowledge and resources needed to make informed decisions about the care of their newborns.

Breastfeeding Support Group Offered at Shore Regional Health Birthing Center

 

 

New moms share breastfeeding stories as part of the Breastfeeding Support Group. Pictured front row from left are Ashlea Pentz with her son Bennett, four months; Lindsey Lafferty with son Charlie, 10 weeks; and Heather Weishaaer with newborn son Jaxson. Back row from left areKaren Van Trieste, RN-BC, MS, IBCLC, CCCE and Carol Leonard, RNC-OB, IBCLC, UM Shore Regional Health Lactation Consultants.

New moms share breastfeeding stories as part of the Breastfeeding Support Group. Pictured front row from left are Ashlea Pentz with her son Bennett, four months; Lindsey Lafferty with son Charlie, 10 weeks; and Heather Weishaaer with newborn son Jaxson. Back row from left are Karen Van Trieste, RN-BC, MS, IBCLC, CCCE and Carol Leonard, RNC-OB, IBCLC, UM Shore Regional Health Lactation Consultants.

New mothers now have a new resource to help them in the early days of caring for their infant in the form of a new breastfeeding support group. Originated by University of Maryland Shore Regional Health lactation consultants Carol Leonard, RNC-OB, IBCLC and Karen Van Trieste, RN-BC, MS, IBCLC, CCCE, the newly formed monthly support group hopes to help new mothers have a successful breastfeeding experience.

Shore Regional Health’s Birthing Center at the UM Shore Medical Center at Easton delivers about 1,000 babies annually, but its services and care for new mothers continue during the days, weeks and even months following delivery. An important priority of the Birthing Center is to educate all new mothers under its care about the benefits and management of breastfeeding so that they have the knowledge and resources needed to make informed decisions about the care of their newborns.

“Despite most mothers wanting to breastfeed, many of them come across challenges that can prevent them from achieving their breastfeeding goals,” says Carol Leonard, one of Shore Regional Health’s certified lactation consultants. “The goal of this breastfeeding support group is to provide our new mothers with a mother to mother support group where they can freely share concerns and questions to make their breastfeeding journey a successful one.”

 

Lactation Consultant Carol Leonard snuggles with 10 week old Charlie Lafferty during a meeting of the newly formed Breastfeeding Support Group.

Lactation Consultant Carol Leonard snuggles with 10 week old Charlie Lafferty during a meeting of the newly formed Breastfeeding Support Group.

The Breastfeeding Support Group meets on the first Tuesday of each month from 10 am to 11:30 am at UM Shore Medical Center at Easton. Meetings are held adjacent to the Birthing Center, in the 5th floor Requard Social Center. This month’s meeting will be held on Tuesday, August 6. In honor of World Breastfeeding Week, which takes place August 1-7,this month’s meeting features several door prizes including a handmade nursing pillow and Medela Harmony breast pump.  

“As lactation consultants, we help families deal with common concerns such as how to start breastfeeding successfully and how to return to work while breastfeeding,” says Karen Van Trieste. “Bringing together other moms who are going through the same transitions can provide an additional resource for breastfeeding mothers.”

In addition to the support group, Shore Regional Health offers a number of resources for new mothers.

“We offer ‘rooming in’ for all mothers, and we encourage placing the baby skin-to-skin with mom at delivery and feeding within one hour of birth. These practices have been shown to increase breastfeeding,’ says Patty MacDougall, MSN, RNC-OB, Manager of Women’s and Children’s Services. “With our full-time lactation services and the support group, we will continue to help assure that our new mothers have all the tools necessary have a successful breastfeeding experience.”

Breastfeeding and prenatal education and support is available to both new and expectant mothers. The Birthing Center, whose nursing team is comprised of nurses certified in a variety of prenatal specialties, offers lactation consultant services almost 24 hours a day.

To learn more about the Birthing Center at UM Shore Medical Center at Easton, please visit www.shorehealth.org.