Author Archives: Christina Wingate-Spence

Dorchester General Hospital Foundation Supports Emergency Department

Members of the Dorchester General Hospital Foundation’s Board of Directors gathered after a recent meeting. Shown are (back row) Brian Leutner, executive director, UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester; Dr. Morris Effron; William Jarmon, Jr.; Dr. Bruce Bernard; Vernon Phillips, III; Dr. Edmund Connelly; Kim Lidell; (front row) Diane McCarthy, president, Dorchester General Hospital Auxiliary; E. Thomas Merryweather, secretary; Kathy Freund, administrative support and recording secretary; Ida Jane Baker, president; Dr. William Bair; and William L. Wise, III, vice president.

The Emergency Department at University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Dorchester, which treats more than 20,000 residents and visitors of the Mid Shore each year, was the beneficiary of the Dorchester General Hospital’s most recent annual appeal. As a result of major gifts to the appeal, numerous pieces of vital equipment were purchased for the Department, including modern bariatric stretchers whose cost totalled more than $35,000.

“Emergency care is something that most of us will utilize at some point in our lives, either for ourselves or for a loved one,” says Ida Jane Baker, Foundation president. “Because of that, it has been and will continue to be a top priority of the hospital’s Foundation to fund state-of-the-art equipment that not only makes patients more comfortable, but through its innovation, also saves lives. The Foundation Board of Directors is most grateful for the generosity of our community supporters and the hospital’s Auxiliary for their continued funding of emergency care services here in our local community.”

Led by Mrs. Baker, the Dorchester General Hospital Foundation has been raising funds for decades in support of programs, services, equipment and technologies used in patient care at UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester. The Foundation’s Board of Directors includes William L. Wise, III, vice president; E. Thomas Merryweather, secretary; Dr. Bruce Bernard; Dr. Edmund Connelly; Robert Costos; Dr. Morris Effron; Ken Kozel, president and CEO, UM Shore Regional Health; Kim Lidell; and new members Dr. William Bair; William Jarmon, Jr.; Vernon Phillips, III; and Diane McCarthy, president, Dorchester General Hospital Auxiliary.

To learn more about ways to support UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester, contact Ida Jane Baker, Foundation president, at 410-228-8182.

Dorchester Auxiliary, Foundation Support Emergency Care

Shown with the Emergency Department’s new bladder scanner are Diane McCarthy, Auxiliary president; Ida Jane Baker, Foundation president; Brian Leutner, executive director, UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester; Cathy Weber, nurse manager, Emergency Department; Joy Loeffler, Auxiliary vice president and Robin Hood Shop chair; Cathy Gullion, manager, Robin Hood Shop and Auxiliary treasurer; and Debbie Thomas, Auxiliary member.

In response to the Dorchester General Hospital Foundation’s most recent annual appeal benefiting the Emergency Department at University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Dorchester, the hospital’s Auxiliary contributed more than $17,000, funding two pieces of essential equipment.

With the Auxiliary’s donation, the Foundation purchased a bladder scanner, a non-invasive ultrasound used to assess urinary retention and urinary incontinence, both of which can be symptoms of significant urological conditions in patients of any age, but especially the elderly. The Emergency Department is also home to a new ice machine, purchased using the Auxiliary’s contribution.

“The first priority of the Emergency Department is to provide the right care at the right time, during situations when patients need it the most,” comments Cathy Weber, RN, BSN, CEN, manager of Emergency Services, UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester. “For decades, the generosity of our hospital’s auxiliary, the Foundation and countless members of our local community have made it possible for our team to offer innovative—and quite often life-saving—emergency care, to our patients of all ages, in the most efficient and effective ways imaginable. We are truly grateful for their continued support of Emergency Services.”

Additional information about fundraising initiatives of the Dorchester General Hospital Foundation can be obtained by contacting Ida Jane Baker, Foundation president, at 410-228-8182.

UM SRH Team Members Complete Leadership Courses

Several UM Shore Regional Health and UM Community Medical Group team members recently participated in courses offered by University of Maryland Medical System’s Health Care Leadership Institute.

All programs offered by the Health Care Leadership Institute are aligned with the strategic direction of UMMS and are targeted to meet specific leadership needs across the System.

Team members who completed courses include:

Foundations of Leadership

(Participants divided into cohorts)

  • Rebecca Baxter
  • Meredith Bennett
  • Linda Callahan
  • Brandi Covey
  • Robert Cunningham
  • Katie Dadds
  • Kathryn Davis
  • Kathy Elliott
  • Robin Ford
  • Jamie Hagadorn
  • Ann Marie Hernandez
  • Roland Jones
  • Jessica Kunz
  • Stephanie Pete
  • Eugenia Scott
  • Bobbi Simkins
  • Patricia Steele
  • Elizabeth Todd
  • Christina Wingate-Spence
  • Sally Worm

Advanced Leadership

(Participants divided into cohorts)

  • Robert Carroll
  • Patricia Focht
  • Cheryl Ruff

 People Leadership

  • Warren Scull

Operations Leadership for Directors

  • Kevin Chapple
  • Jo Ann Thomson

Strategic Leadership for Executives

  • Brian Leutner

UM CMG – Primary Care Welcomes Michael Gasparovich, DO

University of Maryland Community Medical Group (UM CMG) recently announced the addition of Denton-based primary care provider Michael Gasparovich, DO. Dr. Gasparovich’s specializes in family medicine and preventative care.

A board certified physician with the American Osteopathic Board of Family Practice, Dr. Gasparovich is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. He completed an internship and residency with Kennedy Memorial Hospitals.

“We are very excited to have Dr. Gasparovich join our team at  University of Maryland Community Medical Group in our Denton-based Primary Care practice,” says Michele Wilson, vice president of operations for UM CMG. “Dr. Gasparovich will offer primary care patients in Caroline County compassionate and comprehensive care for a broad range of health services.”

UM CMG is a University of Maryland Medical System-owned network of more than 300 primary care physicians, specialists- and advanced practice clinicians. As part of UM CMG, Dr. Gasparovich is affiliated with UM Shore Regional Health and is currently seeing patients at 836 S. 5th Avenue in Denton. Patients may make an appointment to see him by calling 410-479-5900.

UM CMG consists of community-based provider practices affiliated with UM Baltimore Washington Medical Center, UM Charles Regional Medical Center, University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown Campus and UM Shore Regional Health.  A list of UM CMG providers is available at http://docfind.umms.org/cmg.

Free Prostate Cancer Screenings Scheduled in Kent and Talbot Counties

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men in the United States aside from non-melanoma skin cancer. CDC statistics also show that it is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death among men of all races and Hispanic origin populations.

To promote early detection of prostate cancer, the Cancer Program at University of Maryland Shore Regional Health has scheduled free screenings in two locations across the region.

A Prostate Cancer Screening and Forum will be held on Monday, September 18 beginning at 5:30 p.m. at Mount Olive AME Church, 24852 Lambs Meadow Road in Worton.  The Prostate Cancer Forum and dinner will be sponsored by Mt. Olive AME, the Minority Outreach and Technical Assistance (MOTA) Program and the Kent County Health Department, and partially funded by the Maryland Department of Health Cigarette Restitution Funds. Free prostate cancer screenings will be provided by University of Maryland Shore Regional Health and Christopher Parry, DO, of UM Community Medical Group – Urology. To register for the forum, dinner and screening at the Worton location, call Andrea Edwards, RN, at 410-778-7970.

“Thanks to our various community partners including University of Maryland Shore Regional Health, Dr. Parry, MOTA and Mount Olive Church, our local health department is once again able to provide these free screenings to the men of Kent County and its surrounding areas,” says Edwards, a nurse with the Kent County Health Department. “We would like to encourage wives and daughters to bring their husbands, fathers, sons and brothers to this event, not just for the screening, but for the useful information about prostate cancer that will be shared. Everyone is welcome!”

On Tuesday, September 26, free prostate cancer screenings will be offered at University of Maryland Shore Medical Pavilion at Easton, 490 Cadmus Lane, Suite 104. The screenings, which will be offered from 5-8 p.m., are being coordinated by the Cancer Program in partnership with the Talbot County NAACP and the Chesapeake Multicultural Resource Center.  Participating physicians include University of Maryland Shore Regional Health and UM Community Medical Group – affiliated urologists, R. Duane Cespedes, MD; John Foley, MD; John Knud-Hansen, MD, FACS; Andrew Riggin, MD;  and Christopher Runz, DO. To register for screening at the Easton location, call the Cancer Center at UM Shore Regional Health at 410-820-6800.

“One of our top priorities at University of Maryland Shore Regional Health is to provide members of our local communities with access to preventive care and screenings such as this one,” comments Nina Weisenborn, BSN, RN, clinical research nurse, UM Shore Regional Health Cancer Center. “Our goal – not just for those patients with prostate cancer, but all cancers – is to make an early diagnosis so that evaluation and treatment can be initiated as early as possible in the disease process. This not only increases rates of survival – it ultimately helps us to create healthier communities for the patients we serve.”

Those interested in being screened are encouraged to discuss the testing with their primary care providers to determine if the PSA blood test will benefit them in the early detection of prostate cancer and other prostate health issues.

The screenings in both locations are open to the public.  Uninsured and underinsured are welcome to participate.  Pre-registration is required for screening at either location as space is limited.

Kirk Receives Scholarship to Attend ASHE Conference

Michelle Kirk, director of Facilities Management and Environmental and Life Safety Officer at UM Shore Regional Health, was recently awarded the American Society for Healthcare Engineering’s (ASHE) Ilse B. Almanza Scholarship, making it possible for her to attend the ASHE Annual Conference and Technical Exhibition. The scholarship was established to support education and training to develop future leaders committed to optimizing the health care physical environment.

With a membership of more than 12,000, ASHE is the largest association devoted to professionals who design, build, maintain and operate hospitals and other health care facilities. It is a personal membership group of the American Hospital Association and is a trusted industry resource that provides education, regulatory guidance, networking, advocacy representation and professional development for its members, like Kirk who has been a member for the past several years.

Cardiac Rehab – Making Dorchester’s Hearts Healthier

Fran Johnson, a long-time patient of cardiac rehabilitation at UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester, has greatly benefitted from the program and the expertise of its team members including Mary Beth Linthicum.

Sally Worm and Mary Beth Linthicum of the Center for Pulmonary Fitness and Wellness

Heart health is a hot topic in today’s increasingly health conscious society. Heart-healthy diets, exercises, superfoods and lifestyles are just a few of the buzz words we read in magazines, hear on our favorite morning news shows and observe on countless food labels and packages in the aisles of our most frequented grocery stores. Why all the buzz? In the United States, one in four deaths is caused by heart disease, making it the leading cause of death for men and women.

Risk factors for heart disease include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, inactivity, obesity, having diabetes, family history and partaking in an unhealthy diet. The good news? In many cases, heart disease can be prevented by making healthier diet and exercise choices, and through management of chronic medical conditions.

For patients deemed by their medical providers as being at high risk for cardiovascular disease, and for those who’ve already suffered a heart attack or who have undergone an invasive cardiovascular procedure (heart transplantation, bypass surgery, valve replacement, angioplasty or stent implantation), there are programs designed to help get one’s heart health back up to speed while on the path to recovery.

Cardiac rehabilitation services offered through University of Maryland Shore Regional Health can improve – and in some cases, fully restore – a patient’s cardiac function. Centers for Cardio-Pulmonary Fitness and Wellness are available at UM Shore Medical Centers at Chestertown, Dorchester and Easton. All accredited by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation , the Centers offer a comprehensive, four-phase program.

According to Sally Worm, RN, CCRP, program manager, Cardio-Pulmonary Fitness and Wellness, the first phase of the Fitness and Wellness program typically begins during an in-patient hospital stay following a heart attack, another type of cardiac episode or surgical procedure. The primary goal of phase one is to educate the patient about his or her specific health issues and the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation.

“We do a risk stratification based on the patient’s heart function, age, mobility and the type of procedure that he or she just had,” remarks Worm. “These are all factors that will determine the course of rehabilitation.”

Phase two is an outpatient program, initiated upon discharge from the hospital, lasting 12-36 visits depending on the patient’s individual needs. In this phase, the patient – and his or her family – receives a personalized plan of education, detailing specific health issues, suggested exercise regimens and other things that can be done to lower risk factors.   “This part of the program is designed to help patients meet their specific goals using a wide selection of professional cardiovascular and resistance training equipment,” she says. “Center staff work with patients to develop a personalized exercise regimen, in a safe, supervised setting where heart function is being monitored.”

“Each individual receives a customized plan with a schedule created based on personal preferences,” Worm continues. “Attendance is critical to the success of the program. We don’t tell them when they should come in for rehab; we work collaboratively with them to develop a compatible program. We want them to be able to make it work with their schedule, making it easier to become a part of their daily lives. This sets them up for success.”

In addition to the physical exercise component, during the second phase of the cardiac rehabilitation program, patients have access to group and individual educational opportunities that discuss heart-healthy nutrition, weight and blood pressure control, and medication and stress management.

“An important component of any course of rehab is education,” Worm comments. “For example, in the case of someone with hypertension, we would work with the patient on blood pressure under control.”

During the program’s third phase, participants exercise independently at the Center under the supervision of specially-trained registered nurses who work with primary care providers to offer guidance, monitoring, support and a record of the patient’s outcomes.

After their initial course of rehab is complete, there is an option for patients to continue to come to the Center and exercise, which is the final phase of the program. “Many of our patients opt to do this because the adult fitness programs are offered in a supportive atmosphere with other cardiac rehab patients,” says Worm. “The social support that the other patients provide is truly a critical component – it provides such a personal connection.”

Fran Johnson, a long-time patient of the Center for Cardio-Pulmonary Fitness and Wellness at UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester, speaks very highly of the cardiac rehabilitation program and the impact it’s made in her health and her life. “This is an amazing program,” she says. “This program has seen me through so many bad times. I never thought I’d get back to where I am now. I come in here and am surrounded by friends. Both the staff and the other people who come for rehab are very encouraging and friendly – you know immediately that you will never be on your own.”

“This is a very personal place for the people who come here,” comments Mary Beth Linthicum, BSN, RRT, a team member of the Dorchester Center.  “Because of the nature of the work we do, we get the chance to develop relationships with our patients. Those relationships help us to anticipate our patients’ needs, which machines they prefer and just knowing when they need a little extra attention.”

According to Linthicum, the biggest motivator for cardiac rehabilitation patients quite often comes from the other patients.  “When patients first get here, often after a significant cardiac event, they tend to feel alone. Then, they meet other people who are going through exactly what they are experiencing, which gives them hope that they will get back to where they once were. It’s truly amazing how motivating and uplifting that social connection is. For us – their care team – it is very rewarding to see them improve and find their way back to good health,” she says.

In addition to the comprehensive care provided by the Center for Pulmonary Fitness and Wellness team, throughout the course of the cardiac rehabilitation program, patients have access to a multidisciplinary team of respiratory therapists, dieticians, social workers, clinical pharmacists, diabetes educators, and physical therapists.

“I’m so proud of the team we have,” comments Worm. “They love their work and it really shows when they are working with their patients – they make it look effortless.”

Cardiac rehabilitation may be beneficial to patients experiencing one or more of the following: heart attack; recipient of open-heart surgery, angioplasty or heart transplant; diagnosed with angina, heart failure or peripheral artery disease (PAD); and/or considered at risk for developing coronary artery or vascular disease. Patients must be referred to the Center for Cardiopulmonary Fitness and Wellness by their physician.

Lester Matthews learned first-hand the value of the cardiac rehabilitation program after having a left ventricular assistive device (LVAD) placed in June, 2016 to assist his weakened heart pump blood more efficiently. While on the organ transplant list, Matthews worked with the Fitness and Wellness team at UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester to help increase his strength, stamina and overall quality of life while awaiting his new heart.

“The cardiac rehab team was great,” he says. “Because of my LVAD, they had to follow different protocols, which they quickly learned and adapted my rehab regimen accordingly.”

On Christmas Day of 2016, Matthews received the call that a heart was available and on December 26, he underwent transplant surgery at University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore. He experienced great ease and efficiency in receiving pre and post-transplant care locally at UM Shore Regional Health, made possible through its affiliation with University of Maryland Medical System. Once cleared by his medical team, Matthews returned to Dorchester for post-operative cardiac rehabilitation, where he improved his functionality. “They got me going again,” he says.

“Research shows that patients who participate in cardiac rehab live an average of 8-10 years longer than those who do not,” adds Worm. “With our help, they learn how to better take care of themselves. To see a patient go from having little to no energy to being able to return to the activities they most enjoy is very rewarding.”

Additional information about the Centers for Fitness and Wellness at UM Shore Regional Health can be obtained by calling 410-228-5511, ext. 8201 (Dorchester); 410-822-1000, ext. 5208 (Easton); or 410-778-3300, ext. 2222 (Chestertown).

Easton Cardiologist Places First MRI-Compatible Biventricular Pacemaker in Maryland

Benjamin Remo, MD, FAAC, and Patricia Lancaster, CRNP of UM Community Medical Group – Cardiology; Tom Eason; Gary Jones, regional director, Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Services, UM Shore Regional Health; and Amy Grier, RN, Medtronic Senior Clinical Specialist.

The five-mile drive across the Chesapeake Bay Bridge is considered by some to be a terrifying experience and the iconic structure has even been coined the ‘scariest bridge in America’ in a number of news stories and on entertainment shows. Imagine experiencing a cardiac episode mid-way across the Bridge – a bridge traveler’s worst nightmare.  That very thing – a syncopal episode – happened to Cordova resident Tom Eason when he and his wife, Martha, were traveling across the west-bound span in March, 2015.

“We were headed out of town on vacation and while crossing the Bridge, Tom blacked out,” Martha recalls. With nowhere to pull over in the midst of traffic, she quickly grab the wheel, guiding the car until they could safely stop the car once across. She then dialed 911 and her husband was taken by ambulance to an area hospital. Tests in the emergency department revealed nothing significant; it was determined the episode was caused by low glucose levels and Tom was released.

Eason went about his normal activities, but several weeks later, experienced another episode. “I just knew that something wasn’t right – something felt off,” he says. This second go around, he sought treatment in the Emergency Department at University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Easton, where he was assessed by R. Bruce Helmly, MD, cardiologist with UM Community Medical Group – Cardiology.

Cardiac monitoring revealed that Eason was experiencing asystolic events – periods of no heart beats – lasting up to 30 seconds, caused by a condition called sick sinus syndrome (SSS). SSS occurs when the sinus node — the heart’s natural pacemaker — stops functioning properly. After making a diagnosis, Dr. Helmly contacted his partner, Benjamin Remo, MD, cardiologist and electrophysiologist, to perform an emergency pacemaker implantation.

A pacemaker is a small device implanted into a patient’s chest that stabilizes heart rhythms by using electrical pulses to simulate a normal heart rhythm. During Eason’s procedure, Dr. Remo placed an MRI-compatible dual chamber permanent pacemaker system.  A dual chamber pacemaker system has one lead in the right atrium – the top right chamber of the heart that receives blood coming back to the heart – and one lead in the right ventricle – the bottom right chamber of the heart that pumps blood out of the heart.

“Left untreated, conditions like sick sinus syndrome result in the heart’s inability to function properly,” explains Dr. Remo. “As a result of this arrhythmia, the heart may not be able to pump adequate amounts of blood to the brain and body, causing symptoms such as fatigue, shortness of breath and fainting. In extreme cases, it can lead to loss of consciousness or even death.”

This past spring, an echocardiogram found that Eason’s ejection fraction – the amount of blood leaving the heart’s ventricles each time it contracts – was abnormal, demonstrating systolic heart failure – reduced pumping functionality of the heart.

While Eason did well with the original pacemaker system for two years, it was decided that his pacemaker system needed to be upgraded to a biventricular system, in which a third lead is added to the left side of the heart. “Biventricular pacemakers send small electrical impulses through the leads and behave more like the heart’s intrinsic electrical conduction system,” says Dr. Remo.

Dr. Remo and his team felt an MRI-compatible system would be the best device for Eason’s condition as it would not only improve the patient’s cardiac function, but would also best fit his lifestyle as an active man with a long life expectancy. “Given Mr. Eason’s young age, the likelihood of him needing an MRI scan at some point in his life is pretty high as they are used to diagnose a number of conditions affecting the brain, peripheral nervous system, and muscles,” says Dr. Remo.

Eason was a candidate for a biventricular device recently developed and released by Medtronic, a medical device company with expertise in technologies that manage cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. The device selected for Eason is part of the first FDA-approved portfolio containing three models of MRI-compatible cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemakers (CRT-Ps). Unlike patients with traditional biventricular pacemakers, patients who receive the new MRI compatible CRT-Ps are also able to receive MRI scans, which can help diagnose other health conditions.

According to Dr. Remo, MRI scanners use large magnets that can interfere with a non-compatible system’s function. “These new CRT-P devices developed by Medtronic enable medical providers to better manage complex heart conditions while also making it possible for patients to receive MRI scans when necessary,” he says.

On July 20, Eason became the recipient of an MRI-compatible biventricular pacemaker with Dr. Remo performing the procedure. According to Medtronic, it was the first of its kind to be implanted in the state of Maryland.

“This new, state-of-the-art pacemaker will not only help Mr. Eason’s heart to pump more efficiently, sustaining adequate circulation to his body’s organs and tissues, it should greatly improve his quality of life and his overall health in years to come. It’s also a comfort that his device allows for any diagnostic MRI scanning that may be needed in the future,” comments Dr. Remo.

Neither Dr. Remo nor his team members had knowledge that they were implanting the first MRI-compatible biventricular pacemaker system in all of Maryland. As Remo explains, “Our number one priority was to provide our patient with the optimal system available. The fact that he was the first in the State to receive this device is an honor for my team and me, especially given the larger academic medical centers in Maryland. We take great pride in our ability to offer Eastern Shore residents such innovative technologies, right here in our community hospital.”

“I had no idea until after the procedure that I was the first person in all of Maryland to receive this type of cardiac device,” remarks Eason. “I cannot adequately express how grateful I am to have been able to receive such innovative health care so close to home, practically in my back yard.”

Martha adds, “It meant a lot to my family and me to be able to be at the hospital during the procedure and visit with him afterward, without having far to travel.”

Speaking about Dr. Remo and his team – nurse practitioner Patricia Lancaster, device nurse Dawn Ament, and electrophysiology lab nurses and technologists – Eason comments, “I have all the confidence in the world in this team – my home team. Thanks to them, I’m feeling fantastic and have returned to an active lifestyle at work, I’m boating and am simply enjoying life!”

Information about cardiovascular services offered at UM Shore Regional Health can be found at UMShoreRegional.org. Patients can learn more about cardiology and electrophysiology services provided by Dr. Remo and his team by calling the UM Community Medical Group – Cardiology practice at 410-822-5571.

University of Maryland Community Medical Group Announces the Opening of UM CMG – Gastroenterology

University of Maryland Community Medical Group (UM CMG) recently announced the addition of a gastroenterology practice on the Eastern Shore, UM CMG – Gastroenterology. Previously known as Digestive Health Associates, the team of specialists will continue seeing patients at 511 Idlewild Avenue, Suite B in Easton.

Gastroenterologists diagnose, treat and prevent disorders of the digestive system, which includes the esophagus, gallbladder, stomach, small intestine and colon. Our specialists provide medical, surgical and diagnostic services for all disorders and diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. This includes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

The practice consists of the following expert physicians and advanced practice providers:

  • Michael Fisher, MD, FACG
  • Hai-Ou Laura Jin, MD
  • Volkan Taskin, MD
  • Matthew Troshinsky, MD
  • Karen Fisher, CRNP
  • Mary Horseman, CRNP
  • Lisa Roser, CRNP

UM CMG is a University of Maryland Medical System-owned network of more than 300 primary care physicians, specialists- and advanced practice clinicians. As part of this medical group, UM CMG – Gastroenterology is affiliated with UM Shore Regional Health.

“We are excited to be bringing this practice of specialists into the UM CMG family, which will allow us to help provide expert gastroenterology services to the Eastern Shore,” says Michele Wilson, vice president of operations for UM CMG.

Patients may make an appointment with UM CMG – Gastroenterology by calling 410-822-6005.

 

About University of Maryland Community Medical Group 

The University of Maryland Community Medical Group (UM CMG) is a multi-hospital, multi-specialty, community-based physician-led group, and part of the University of Maryland Medical System. With more than 300 primary care physicians, specialists, and advanced practice clinicians in more than 65 locations across the state, UM CMG offers patients a vast network of highly experienced providers, delivering care right in their neighborhood. UM CMG consists of community-based provider practices affiliated with UM Baltimore Washington Medical Center, UM Charles Regional Medical Center, University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown Campus and UM Shore Regional Health.  A list of UM CMG providers is available at http://docfind.umms.org/cmg. For more information, visit www.umcmg.org.

Shore Behavioral Health Provider Recognized for Positive Patient Outcome

The Dorchester General Hospital Foundation recently received a donation in honor of local psychiatrist, Saeed Salehinia, MD, Behavioral Health Services provider at University of Maryland Shore Regional Health. The donation, given by a family member of a past patient, was made in Dr. Salehinia’s name for his contributions toward the patient’s positive outcome.  Pictured celebrating his recognition are (back row) Ida Jane Baker, president, Dorchester General Hospital Foundation; Eric Anderson, MD, medical director, Shore Behavioral Health;  Jacki Crawford, RN, manager, Shore Behavioral Health; Alida Bushe, RN; Leslie Fox;  Raynette Travers; Kathleen Elzey; John Mistrangelo, program administrator, Shore Behavioral Health; Deborah Weber; (front row)  Jeff Biele;  Dr. Salehinia;  Manjula Borge, MD; and Barbara Sherwood-Hill.

Auxiliary Escort Services Offered at UM SMC at Easton

Members of the Auxiliary of Memorial Hospital at Easton would like to remind team members at University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Easton that Escort Services are available at the hospital, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.

The Auxiliary’s Escort volunteers offer wheelchair transport to those needing assistance, including those being discharged after an inpatient stay, those receiving outpatient services (ie: diagnostic imaging, outpatient surgery, etc…) and visitors.

For additional information or to request a volunteer escort, please call the Escort Services desk at hospital extension 5712. New volunteers are always welcome – to learn more about volunteer opportunities with the Auxiliary, contact hospital extension 5839.

HR News You Can Use: EAP Program

Need assistance with Life Management or Work-Life Assistance?  You have a benefit that can help you!  Carebridge Corporation provides personal help for both work and life situations.  (The program is also referred to as an Employee Assistance Program (EAP).  All staff have access to licensed Carebridge Counselors, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.  You are entitled to three free sessions either by phone or in person.  Carebridge assistance is fully confidential.

Call: 800-437-0911

Email: clientservice@carebridge.com

www.myliferesource.com

Secure Access Code: RXKY3

Upcoming Events: July 2017

 

Auxiliary Sales

Red & Blue Sale – Now thru Monday, 7/3, Robin Hood Shop, 416 High Street, Cambridge. All red and/or blue clothing will be $.50 cents (excluding Boutique items). Managed by the Dorchester General Hospital Auxiliary, Shop proceeds benefit programs, services, equipment and patient care at UM SMC at Dorchester. Contact: 410-228-6339.

Second Saturday Sale – Saturday, 7/8,10am-5pm (note extended hours), Robin Hood Shop, 416 High Street Cambridge. All shirts will be $.25 cents (excluding Boutique items). A volunteer from Associated Black Charities will be on hand to do blood pressure screenings until 2pm. Managed by the Dorchester General Hospital Auxiliary, Shop proceeds benefit programs, services, equipment and patient care at UM SMC at Dorchester. Contact: 410-228-6339.

K & J Marketing – Everything $6 Sale — Tuesday, 7/18, 7am–4pm, UM Shore Medical Center at Chestertown, Conference Center. Offering jewelry, scarves, electronics, accessories for children and many other items. Payroll deduction will be available for SRH employees. Sponsored by the Chester River Hospital Center Auxiliary, proceeds will benefit programs, services, equipment and patient care at UM SMC at Chestertown. Contact: 410-348-2159.

Breast Cancer Support

Transition to Wellness – Free workshops for breast cancer survivors and patients who are ending treatment.

Survivors Offering Support (SOS) – Free program pairing women who have breast cancer with mentors who are breast cancer survivors. If you need support or would like to become a mentor, call 410-822-1000, ext. 5866.

Look Good … Feel Better – Monday, 7/17, 10am-12pm, Cancer Center, Easton. Free ACS program for women with cancer includes hair, skin and make-up tips, samples and a visit to the wig room. Contact: 410-822-1000, ext. 5355.

 Breast Cancer Support Group – Tuesday, 7/25, 6-7:30pm, Cancer Center, Easton. Contact: 410-822-1000, ext. 5387.

Find more information about The Breast Center’s programs and services at UMShoreRegional.org/breast-center

Cancer Support

Cancer Support Group/Easton – Thursday, 7/6 and 7/20, Cancer Center, Easton. Information and support for patients at any stage – diagnosis, treatment, recovery and survivorship. Contact: 443-254-5940.

US TOO Prostate Cancer Support Group – Tuesday, 7/11, 6:30pm, Cancer Center, Easton. Information and support for patients at any stage – diagnosis, treatment, recovery and survivorship. Contact: 410-820-6800, ext. 2300. Spouses and friends are encouraged to attend.

Cancer Support Group/Chestertown – Monday, 7/24, 7pm, UM SMC at Chestertown, Education Center. Information and support for patients at any stage – diagnosis, treatment, recovery and survivorship. Contact: 410-778-7668, ext. 2175.

Find more information about cancer treatment and support services online at UMShoreRegional.org/cancer_program.

Cardiopulmonary

Free Blood Pressure Screenings/Easton & Cambridge – Easton: every Tuesday and Wednesday, 9am-12pm, Diagnostic & Imaging Center. Cambridge: every Tuesday & Friday, 11am-1pm, UM SMC at Dorchester, Main Lobby. (Excluding holidays.)

Childbirth & New Parent Education

Labor & Delivery Class – Saturday, 7/8, 9am-3:30pm, UM SMC at Easton, Health Education Center. Overview of maternal reproductive health; signs, symptoms and stages of labor, including pain management; techniques for a successful birth experience; cesarean delivery; and recovery after the birth. Free; register by phone, 410-822-1000, ext. 5231.

Breastfeeding Support Group – Tuesday, 7/18, 10-11:30am, UM SMC at Easton, 5th floor meeting room. Led by lactation consultants for new and expectant mothers. Contact: 410-822-1000 or 410-228-5511, ext. 5700.

Breastfeeding Class— Saturday, 7/22, 9am-12:30pm, UM SMC at Easton, Health Education Center. Information about the benefits for you and your baby, and tips and techniques for successful breastfeeding. Free; register by phone, 410-822-1000, ext. 5231 or e-mail jkaminskas@umm.edu.

Find more information about Birthing Center programs and services at UMShoreRegional.org/programs/birthing-center/services.

Diabetes Education and Support

Shore Kids Camp – Monday, 7/17 – Friday, 7/21, MEBA Engineering School, Rte 33, Easton. Four-day camp experience that helps children with diabetes learn about their disease and how to manage it in a safe and healthy environment while enjoying many activities, including bowling, boat rides, and visits to organic farms and area museums. Registration deadline 7/7. Contact: Wynne Aroom, 410-822-1000, ext. 5286, waroom@umm.edu.

Diabetes Self-Management Class/Chestertown – Tuesday, 7/11-18-25, 1-4pm. UM SMC at Chestertown Education Center. Medical information and strategies enabling patients to manage their diabetes for optimal wellness. Referral and advance registration required. Contact: 410-822-1000, ext. 5196.

Diabetes Self- Management Class/Easton – Two sessions: Tuesday, 7/11-18-25, 9am-12pm; and Wednesday, 7/12-19-26, 4:30-7:30pm. UM SMC at Easton, UM Diabetes & Endocrinology Center. Medical information and strategies enabling patients to manage their diabetes for optimal wellness. Referral and advance registrations required. Contact: 410-822-1000, ext. 5196.

Diabetes Support Group/Denton – Wednesday, 7/5, 5pm, St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, Denton.  Led by Doris Allen Tate, CRNP, CDE, UM Diabetes & Endocrinology Center. Contact: 410-822- 1000 ext. 5195.

Diabetes Support Group/Easton – Monday, 7/10, 5:30pm, Brookletts Place, Talbot County Senior Center, Easton. Led by Karen Hollis, RD, CDE. Contact: 410-822-1000, ext. 5196.

Diabetes Support Group/Chestertown – Tuesday, 7/25, 6:00pm, UM SMC at Chestertown Cafeteria, “Annual Indoor Picnic” — Please bring a diabetes friendly dish to share. Led by Chrissy Nelson, BSN, RN, CDE. Contact 410-778-3300, ext. 2175.

Diabetes Support Group/ Dorchester – Wednesday, 7/26, 5:30pm, Dorchester County YMCA. Led by Renee Woodward, RN, CDE Contact 410-822-1000, ext. 5196.

Find more information about diabetes treatment and support services at UMShoreRegional.org/programs/endocrinology.

Foundation Events

5th Annual Claws for a Cause – Thursday, 7/13, 6-9pm, Fisherman’s Crab Deck in Grasonville. Crab feast and buffet of fried chicken, pork BBQ, and assorted sides.  Benefiting the UM Shore Emergency Center in Queenstown. Ticket prices are $90 in advance; $100 at door. Contact: 410-822-1000, ext. 5763 or alowe@umm.edu.

Aging, Memory Loss, Dementia: How We Think About It – Thursday, 7/27, 6-8pm, UM Shore Medical Center at Easton, Nick Rajacich Education Center, Easton. Speakers, Saeed Salehina, MD and Charles R. Athey, Esq. discuss aging and normal changes in cognitive function, normal and abnormal changes in memory, when should we be worried, causes of “abnormal memory/cognitive changes” and how to approach them and more. Seating is limited, to reserve a seat contact: 410-822-1000, ext. 5792 or janet@umm.edu.

Recovery and Psychosocial Support

Bridge Clinic Support Group – Tuesdays, 7/4, 7/11, 7/18, 7/25, 6-7:30pm, UM SMC at Dorchester. Free, confidential support group meeting for individuals who have been hospitalized for behavioral health reasons and could benefit from assistance with issues after discharge. Varied topics based on participants’ needs. Each participant may bring one family member. Contact: 410-228-5511, ext. 2140.

Stroke Support

Mid-Shore Stroke Support Group – Thursday, 7/6, 12-2pm, 500 Cadmus Lane, Easton. Guest Speaker Deborah Weber “Learning to Cope After a Stroke.” All stroke survivors and/or caregivers and family members are welcome. Contact: Nicole Leonard 410-822-1000 ext. 5068 or nleonard@umm.edu.

Queenstown Stroke Support Group –Tuesday, 7/25, 12-2pm, UM Shore Pavilion at Queenstown, suite 320.  All stroke survivors and/or caregivers and family members are welcome. Contact: Nicole Leonard 410-822-1000 ext. 5068 or nleonard@umm.edu.