Monthly Archives: April 2018

Above & Beyond

The following reports from patients and family members reaffirm
our staff’s commitment to teamwork and putting our patients’ needs first.
Please take a minute to say THANKS!

Once I got back to the therapy area in the Pain Center the receptionist was amazing, Dr. Wills was amazing, as was his assistant! I was offered a cup of hot tea, the heat was turned on for me, the receptionist & dr., & assistant took care of my concerns & they were awesome!

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Both Marcy, my nurse, and Christina, my PT, exemplify the very best in home health. There were professional but personal, kind and caring. I received magnificent care and would highly recommend both to anyone. I am so blessed to have had such 100 percent awesome care from Shore Home Care.

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Paula Baker at Shore Rehab at Queenstown is very helpful in treating my condition. She is very concerned and is evaluating my progress every visit. I am very positive about my rehab.

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The waiting of the area of the Breast Center is pleasantly decorated and very soothing. I did not have blood drawn, but the tech I had for my mammogram was very thorough and took the time to explain what she was doing and why. She did a very good job. I’ve had Yulenda Green the last two times when I’ve come in for a mammogram. She is always very pleasant and professional.

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Sally Worm and the staff at Cardiac Rehab in Easton are excellent!

Observation Area Now Established in UM SMC at Easton

Shown celebrating the opening of the new Observation Area on 2 East are Nancy Bedell, Dr. Dennis DeShields, Mary Collins, Ashley Higgs, Amanda Weems, Keri Tucker, Denise Travers and Ruth Ann Jones.

Patients staying overnight under observation status are now housed in an area of 2 East at UM Shore Medical Center at Easton, according to Nancy Bedell, regional director, Care Coordination.

“This is a 14-bed area where we now congregate observation patients so as to better coordinate their care and monitor their status. The goal is to  ensure they are either admitted or discharged within 23 hours,” says Bedell. “Five of the beds  accommodate telemetry, and there is a trackboard that documents the time of the observation order for each patient, which makes it easier for caregiving staff to keep track of the time.”

Observation patients are now followed by specific hospitalists designated by Shore Bayy Hospitalists Medical Director Dennis DeShields, MD. Nurses serving patients in the observation beds have been trained to do blood draws which decrease the time to get test results. The care team “huddles” every three hours to review the plan of care and identify barriers to meeting the 23-hour mark. Mary Collins, clinical nurse specialist on 2 East, has been very instrumental in conducting staff education and updating procedures.

The new Observation Area was developed by a multidisciplinary group led by Ruth Ann Jones, senior vice president, Patient Care Services and chief nursing officer, and facilitated by DaVita consultants. The group visited two other UMMS hospitals that have observation areas and 2 East Nurse Manager Jennifer Miles attended a conference on observation care. Said Miles, “I am very impressed by how well this group has worked together to better serve our patients.”

“Until now, patients on observation status were scattered in units throughout the hospital so this is a very exciting and promising advancement in patient care,” says Bedell. “We are all very confident that it will help us avoid unnecessary hospital admissions and ensure that patients who are discharged have the tools and understanding they need to follow up on their health issues.”

Joint Commission Tips: Please Read and Heed!

TJC Did You Know?

  • POWER STRIPS – Are power strips allowed? Yes, but they MUST be approved as follows:
    —  for clinical use, through Biomedical Engineering Department
    —  for non-clinical use, through Plant Ops/Maintenance
  • STAINED CEILING TILES – They must be replaced! Be sure to report stained ceiling tiles by submitting a Work Order.
  • ENVIRONMENT OF CARE AND LIFE SAFETY – If you have a question related to the Environment of Care or Life Safety, your contact is UM SRH Life Safety Officer Michelle Kirk, 410-822-1000 ext. 5464, Michelle.Kirk@umm.edu  
  • PATIENT SAFETY – If you have a question or concern related to Patient Safety, your contact is UM SRH Patient Safety Officer  Jean Seiler 410-443-5315, Jean.seiler@umm.edu

Fellowship in Healing: Mid Shore Stroke Support Group Celebrates 10th Anniversary

The MidShore Stroke Support Group celebrated 10 years during their April meeting at Shore Medical Pavilion at Easton. Front row: Walid Kamsheh, medical director, UM Shore Regional Health’s Primary Stroke Center; Donna Richardson; Ruth Arnouts, co-founder of the group who served as coordinator until just recently; Primary Stroke Center nurse Kelly Stacey; and Nicole Leonard, neuroscience specialist/stroke coordinator for the Primary Stroke Center. Back row: Kevin Walsh, George King, Waller Hairston, Elizabeth Ferguson, Jessica Fluharty, RN, formerly with the Primary Stroke Center, and Drake Ferguson.

Ten years ago, retired nurse Ruth Arnouts, of Easton, suffered a potentially life-changing event – a stroke. But for Arnouts, who felt very fortunate that her stroke was relatively mild, the changes that followed were more about helping fellow survivors than coping with personal disabilities or limitations.

“I felt very lucky, and as I learned more about the high incidence of stroke – especially for older people -and how it completely disrupts the lives of survivors and their families, I decided I wanted to give back to the community by helping others recover,” Arnouts says.

Working with Christina Ball, who was then the neuroscience nursing specialist at Shore Medical Center at Easton, Arnouts and a fellow stroke survivor, Melissa Malcolm, started the group and gained new members by referral from hospital. Arnouts coordinated topics and speakers for the meetings until recently, when she gave up the leadership duties but continues to attend the group.

Nicole Leonard pauses with MidShore Stroke Support Group co-founder Ruth Arnouts.

“We started meeting in St. Michaels, moved up to the Brookletts Place senior center in Easton, then to the Presbyterian Church in Easton, and now we gather at Shore Medical Pavilion at Easton,” Arnouts says. “There are usually eight to 12 of us in attendance, and several have been coming for eight years – and a few of us for all ten years.”

UM Shore Regional Health treats approximately 600 stroke patients every year. Those who survive the event find that that recovery poses diverse challenges in such areas as speech, balance, mobility and cognition – challenges that require ongoing effort and determination. to overcome. But survivors should not feel they have to go it alone: Several studies have validated the importance of social support in stroke recovery because social interaction helps ease the depression and isolation felt by many survivors.

Says Nicole Leonard, neuroscience specialist/stroke coordinator for the Primary Stroke Center at UM Shore Medical Center at Easton who now leads the Mid Shore Stroke Support Group and also the Queenstown Stroke Support Group, “Both groups host guest speakers on special topics related to stroke recovery, but they also provide camaraderie, comfort and hope. Members are at varying stages of recovery and they all share their stories. More recent survivors are inspired and encouraged to hear from those who are a few years out but still making progress in overcoming their deficits. They challenge each other to keep improving and celebrate each other’s successes.”

Drake Ferguson has attended the Mid Shore Stroke Support Group with his wife, Elizabeth, since 2008. At the April meeting celebrating the group’s 10th anniversary, he took Leonard’s observations a step further. “Doctors can tell you everything about stroke in the acute phase, but once you are recovering, stroke survivors have much more to offer you because they have lived through it, day to day,” says Ferguson. “It used to be said that you only keep recovering months or up to a year after your stroke, but this group has taught me that you can keep progressing for years if you work at it. We’ve all seen each other improve, whether it’s in our mobility or our speech or some other aspect. I’ve learned so much from others in this room, just through listening and observation – they made me realize that to a large degree, my recovery was and is in my own hands.”

Says another long-time group member, Donna Richardson, “I have learned so much from my fellow survivors and also from the expert presenters who have talked to us about how to cope with different effects of stroke.”  Presentations to the group have focused on a wide array of practical matters, for example, how to minimize your fall risk and how to get up if you fall, what kinds of assistive devices are available to increase your independence and mobility, dealing with sleep problems and vision deficits, nutrition and medications after a stroke, how to avoid becoming a victim of fraud and identity theft, and even learning to a dance after a stroke.

The biggest challenge for Richardson was regaining her ability to drive a car and getting her driver’s license renewed. “I started off in a wheelchair and then graduated to a walker, and finally got myself to be freestanding again. Dealing with the Motor Vehicle Administration was a real battle and it took me five tries, but the group was cheering me on and I did it,” she says.

Caregivers also derive benefit from the group. Says Mandy Owen, who helps group member Waller Hairston with transportation and domestic duties, “Your instinct is to do everything for the survivor so they don’t take any risks. In  listening and talking to family and group members, I learned to resist that instinct and to encourage Waller to do quite a few things on his own.”

Ferguson agrees. “For the caregiver, it’s a fine line between doing too much and not enough, but for the survivor, making a mistake is the way to figure out how to get it right the next time. Elizabeth let me regain my driving skills by starting with our riding mower, and yes, early on I did hit a few trees,” he says with a laugh.

The Mid Shore Group also gets together for fun, hosting an annual holiday party and celebrating milestones like birthdays and wedding anniversaries. “It’s like a family,” observes Jessica Fluharty, formerly neuroscience specialist with UM Shore Regional Health who came to the 10th anniversary meeting to catch up with old friends. “It is really a blessing to see how much the members care for and support each other.”

How much health benefit is gained by participating in a support group? According to the national nonprofit organization, Peers for Progress, studies show that for people with chronic diseases and other conditions, peer support is a “critical and effective strategy for ongoing health care and sustained behavior change.” Social support increases patient knowledge of his or disease and encourages compliance with physician orders, including medication. Those receiving peer support are less likely to require emergency care and report less depression.

In the case of some conditions, peer support can reduce morbidity and mortality rates and increase life expectancy, but in others, the direct and most dramatic benefit is seen in quality of life. Melissa Malcolm states it well, saying, “The stroke support group has been one of the biggest influences in my life.  Everyone in the group has influenced how much of a better person I have become.”

Sign Up for Cultural Competence Course, May 7 at UM Shore Medical Center at Easton

Our nation is experiencing  increasing diversification of its population, a trend that provides both opportunities and challenges for health care providers, health care systems and policy makers to deliver “culturally competent” care. Shore Regional Health will offer a free program, Cultural Competence, May 7, 1-3 p.m. in the Shore Medical Center at Easton Board Room.  It is open to all SRH team members.

Matthew Peters, executive director, Chesapeake Multicultural Resource Center

The course will be conducted by Matthew Peters, executive director of the Chesapeake Multicultural Resource Center.  Dr. Lorelly Solano, coordinator of the Talbot Language and Cultural Competence Project, will also participate.

The learning objectives of this training are:

  • To define the concept of cultural competence
  • To establish a clear and shared understanding of the concepts of diversity and culture
  • To create an awareness of the impact of culture utilizing individual and organizational self-assessments
  • To develop an understanding of the dynamics of difference that emerges in cross cultural encounters
  • Dr. Lorelly Solano, director, Talbot Language and Cultural Competence Project

    To understand effective cross-cultural communication

Please register in advance for the course by contacting Michelle Emrick, memrick@umm.edu or  ext. 5451

New Social Media Posts…..Please Like and Share

The items below were posted on our UM Shore Regional Health Facebook page this week. If you are on Facebook, please help us increase awareness of the page as a resource for updates and information about UM SRH by visiting to LIKE and SHARE the posts of your choice.

Your participation really helps spread the word about the good work done by great team members at UM Shore Regional Health!

  • Round four of the UM Shore Regional Health Sporting Clays Classic takes place this year on June 9th at The Point at Pintail in Queenstown, MD
  • Being a part of the University of Maryland Rehab Network means our patients have greater access to expert rehabilitation teams across the state of Maryland. (Facebook Live!)
  • Congratulations to our March 2018 UM Shore Regional Health Team Members of the Month!
  • Our public health partners at the Dorchester Health Department are holding two upcoming events and public survey for Maryland residents between 18-25.

Mark Your Calendar: Events, Screenings and Support Groups – April 28 -May 31, 2018

APRIL EVENTS

SATURDAY, APRIL 28

  • Big Brother, Big Sister: Sibling Preparation, 9:30 to 11 a.m., UM Shore Medical Center at Easton, Health Education Center. For children ages 3-8. Adjusting to and caring for a new baby (bring a doll or stuffed toy for practice), includes a tour of the Birthing Center.  Free; register by phone, 410-822-1000 or 410-228-5511, ext. 5200.
  • National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Walgreens, Cambridge. Keeping medications when they are no longer needed, storing them improperly, and throwing them away in the trash or toilet can lead to drug abuse, unintentional poisoning, or environmental problems.  This event is an opportunity to drop off expired, unused and unwanted prescription and over-the-counter medications for safe disposal.

APRIL SCREENINGS AND SUPPORT GROUPS

ADDICTIONS/BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

  • Bridge Clinic Support Group – Every Tuesday, 6-7:30pm, UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester. Free, confidential support group meeting for individuals who have been hospitalized for behavioral health reasons and could benefit from assistance with issues after discharge. Varied topics based on participants’ needs. Each participant may bring one family member. Info: 410-228-5511, ext. 2140.

CANCER

  • Breast Cancer – Survivors Offering Support (SOS) – Free program pairing women who have breast cancer with mentors who are breast cancer survivors. If you need support or would like to become a mentor, call 410-822-1000, ext. 5866.

CARDIOPULMONARY

  • Free Blood Pressure Screenings/Easton & Cambridge – Easton: every Tuesday and Wednesday, 9am-12pm, Diagnostic & Imaging Center. Cambridge: every Tuesday & Friday, 11am-1pm, UM SMC at Dorchester, Main Lobby. (Excluding holidays.)

MAY EVENTS

  • Diabetes and You – Tuesdays, May 1-8-15, 6 to 8 p.m. , UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester, Board Room. Three-session educational program to help those with diabetes and their caregivers learn how to manage their disease for optimal wellness. Offered free of charge. To register, contact: Wynne Aroom, RN, CDE, 410-822-1000, ext. 5286.

MONDAY – THURSDAY, MAY 1-4

  • Open Enrollment Assistance  – Sessions are scheduled at UM Shore Medical Centers at Chestertown, Easton and Dorchester and at the Shore Medical Pavilion at Queenstown, Canvasback, the Diagnostic & Imaging Center and the Cancer Center. See HR News You Can Use in this edition of Compass for details.

SATURDAY, MAY 5

  • Preparing for Childbirth – Labor and Delivery, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., UM Shore Medical Center at Easton Health Education Center. Free class for expectant parents and birthing partners; includes a tour of the newly renovated Birthing Center. Free; register by phone: 410-822-1000, ext. 5200.

TUESDAY, MAY 8

  • Dorchester Auxiliary Fashion Show & Tea, 12:15 p.m., Cambridge Women’s Club, 417 High Street (across from the Robin Hood Shop), Cambridge. Enjoy local models showing spring and summer fashions (both dressy and casual) as well as tea and other beverages, “finger foods”, raffles and door prizes. Clothing and accessories will be offered for sale during the event. Tickets: $5, on sale now at the hospital gift shop and The Robin Hood Shop; purchase by May 5.
  • Talk About It Tuesday: From Awareness to Action, 5:30 – 7 p. m., Old Trinity Church, Parish Hall, 1716 Taylors Island Road, Church Creek, MD. Learn tangible things that can be done to help prevent drug abuse in our community, please sign up!  It’s an opportunity to not just talk about opioid issues, but to move from awareness to action.  Dinner will be provided, but RSVPs are required. Sponsored by the Mid-Shore Opioid Misuse Prevention Program. Register online, https://talkaboutittuesday.eventbrite.com or contact Charlene Jones, 410-901-8162. 

SATURDAY, MAY 19

  • Breastfeeding Your Baby, 9 a.m. to 12:15 pm, UM Shore Medical Center at Easton, Health Education Center. Tips and techniques for breastfeeding and pumping. Free; register by phone: 410-822-1000, ext. 5200.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23

  • Chronic Lung Disease: What Is It? How Do We Treat It?, 2 to 3:30 p.m., UM Shore Medical Center at Chestertown, Conference Center. Free seminar presented by Dr. Fernando DeLeon, pulmonologist and Philomena Leon, respiratory therapist. Includes refreshments. RSVP: 410-810-5666, sherrie.hill@umm.edu

SATURDAY, MAY 12

  • Caregiver’s Coffee, 9 to 10:30 a.m., Cancer Center at UM Shore Regional Health, 509 Idlewild Avenue, Easton. Open to family members, friends and others providing care and support for a patient dealing with a cancer diagnosis, treatment and recovery. Topics of discussion include financial concerns, community resources, stress management, self-care and much more. RSVP: Patty Plaskon, 410-820-6800, ext. 5361.
  • Introduction to the YMCA LIVESTRONG Program, 4 p.m., Eastern Shore Conservation Center, 114 S. Washington St., Easton. Presentation by Barbara Jarrell, personal trainer, on the benefits of the LIVESTRONG program for patients in recovery from a cancer diagnosis. Open to patients and their loved ones. RSVP: Patty Plaskon, 410-820-6800, ext. 5361.

MONDAY, MAY 21

  • Prosthesis and Fittings Showcase for Breast Cancer Patients, 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Clarke Comprehensive Breast Center, Easton. Presenter: Lisa Lawson. Call for an appointment: 410-820-9400.

TUESDAY, MAY 22

  • “In the Bag” Sale, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., UM Shore Medical Center at Easton, Health Education Center, Come and browse through hundreds of brand-name purses, wallets, luggage and other bags of every shape, size and color, priced to sell quickly. Sponsored by the Auxiliary of Memorial Hospital at Easton to benefit patient care.

TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY, MAY 29-30

  • $6 Sale, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m., UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester, Main Lobby. Sale offers include hundreds of items — jewelry, scarves, socks, hats, kids’ items, purses and more — all priced at just $6. Sponsored by the Auxiliary of Memorial Hospital at Easton to benefit patient care.

MAY SCREENINGS AND SUPPORT GROUPS

ADDICTIONS/BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

  • Bridge Clinic Support Group – Every Tuesday, 6-7:30pm, UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester. Free, confidential support group meeting for individuals who have been hospitalized for behavioral health reasons and could benefit from assistance with issues after discharge. Varied topics based on participants’ needs. Each participant may bring one family member. Info: 410-228-5511, ext. 2140.

BREASTFEEDING

  • Breastfeeding Support Group – Tuesdays, 5/1 and 5/15, 10 to 11:30 a.m., Birthing Center, UM Shore Medical Center at Easton.

CANCER

  • Breast Cancer Support -Survivors Offering Support (SOS) – Free program pairing women who have breast cancer with mentors who are breast cancer survivors. If you need support or would like to become a mentor, call 410-822-1000, ext. 5866.
  • Cancer Support Group/Easton – Thursdays, 5/3 and 5/17, Cancer Center, Easton. Information and support for patients at any stage – diagnosis, treatment, recovery and survivorship. Info: 443-254-5940.
  • US TOO Prostate Cancer Support Group – Tuesday, 5/8, 6:30pm, Cancer Center, Easton. Q. and A. Session with Urologist Christopher Parry, MD.  Info: call Sharon Richter, RN, 443-994-5792.
  • NEW GROUP! Cancer Caregivers’ Coffee – Saturday, 5/3, 9-10:20 a.m., Cancer Center, Easton. Discussion of varied issues and challenges facing individuals and families assisting patients with cancer. Contact: Patty Plaskon, 410-820-6800, ext. 5361.
  • Cancer Support Group/Chestertown – Monday, 5/28, 7pm, UM Shore Medical Center at Chestertown, Education Center. Information and support for patients at any stage – diagnosis, treatment, recovery and survivorship. Info: 410-778-7668, ext. 2175.

CARDIOPULMONARY SCREENINGS

  • Free Blood Pressure Screenings/Easton & Cambridge – Easton: every Tuesday and Wednesday, 9am-12pm, Diagnostic & Imaging Center. Cambridge: every Tuesday & Friday, 11am-1pm, UM SMC at Dorchester, Main Lobby. (Excluding holidays.)

DIABETES

  • Diabetes Support Group/Denton – Wednesday, 5/2, 5 p.m., St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, 100 S. 5th Avenue, Denton.  Led by Doris Tate. Contact: 410-822-1000, ext. 5195.
  • Diabetes Support Group/Easton — Monday, 5/14, 5:30 p.m., Talbot County Senior Center, 400 Brookletts Ave., Easton. Led by Karen Canter. Contact: 410-822-1000, ext. 5757.
  • Diabetes Support Group/Cambridge – Wednesday, 5/23, 6 p.m., Board Room, Shore Medical Center at Dorchester, 300 Byrn Street, Cambridge. Led by Wynne Aroom. Contact: 410-822-1000, ext. 5138.
  • Diabetes Support Group/Chestertown – Tuesday, 5/29, 6:30 p.m., Education Center, UM Shore Medical Center at Chestertown, 100 Brown St. Led by Chrissy Nelson. Contact: 410-778-3300, ext. 2175.

STROKE SUPPORT

  • Mid-Shore Stroke Support Group – Thursday, 5/3, 12-2pm, UM Shore Medical Pavilion at Easton, 500 Cadmus Lane, Easton. All stroke survivors and/or caregivers and family members are welcome. Info: Nicole Leonard 410-822-1000, ext. 5068 or nleonard@umm.edu.
  • Queenstown Stroke Support Group – Tuesday, 5/22, 12-2pm, UM Shore Pavilion at Queenstown, suite 320.  All stroke survivors and/or caregivers and family members are welcome. Info: Nicole Leonard 410-822-1000 ext. 5068 or nleonard@umm.edu.

Above & Beyond

The following reports from patients and family members reaffirm
our staff’s commitment to teamwork and putting our patients’ needs first.
Please take a minute to say THANKS!

Best care I have ever received, being taken to Emergency at UM Shore Medical Center at Dorchester was a blessing. One of the best doctors I have ever seen.  Don’t find many like him! Radiology staff was very nice and understanding when I needed a short break to breathe. I just want to thank everyone who helped in my care!

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Dr. Eric at UM Shore Emergency Center at Queenstown was awesome.  I got 16 stitches, he did a great job, they came out yesterday, can’t really tell I had stitches there, healed nicely. The nurse and lady that checked me in were all very nice, seemed concerned and very helpful.

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I had a great experience with my C-section & stay at the Birthing Center at Easton.  All my nurses were great, especially Sandy.

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Charles Moore from Shore Home Care was kind, caring and addressed my PT needs spot-on to assist in my recovery from my total knee replacement. His outgoing personality made each visit a pleasure and brightened my day and he went “above and beyond.” I also received excellent care from my home health nurses, Heather Coulbourne and Marcy Schmitt.

 

UM CMG Women’s Health Welcomes Two New Nurse Midwives

Molly Bernish, MSN, CNM

University of Maryland Community Medical Group (UM CMG), announces the addition of two new providers, UM , Molly Bernish, MSN, CNM and Sunny Granger, MSN, CNM.

Bernish is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, where she received both her B.S. and M.S. in Nursing. She received her Post-Master’s Certificate in Midwifery at Shenandoah University. Her practice includes the full scope of midwifery care, including gynecological, contraceptive, prenatal, intrapartum and postpartum care.

Granger, also a certified nurse midwife, received her B.S. in Nursing from Duquesne University and her M.S. in Nurse Midwifery from the Midwifery Institute of Philadelphia. She specializes in caring for women and families during labor, delivery and the post-partum.

Sunny Granger, MSN, CNM

“We are very pleased to welcome Molly and Sunny to University of Maryland Community Medical Group in our Women’s Health practice,” comments Michele Wilson, chief operating officer for UM CMG. “Our Women’s Health patients on the Eastern Shore will benefit from their expertise and dedication as women’s health care providers.”

UM CMG consists of community-based provider practices affiliated with UM Baltimore Washington Medical Center, UM Charles Regional Medical Center, University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown Campus and UM Shore Regional Health.  A list of UM CMG providers is available at http://docfind.umms.org/cmg.

HR News You Can Use: Open Enrollment Sessions Scheduled at Seven Sites, May 1- 4, 2018

Open Enrollment for Benefits Coming Soon!

Open Enrollment begins on May 1.  Everyone needs to participate, even if you think you won’t change your plan!  Enrollment continues through May 22, 2018.

This year EVERYBODY must enroll, even if you’re not making any changes to your health, vision, or dental plans.  Flexible spending and HSA requires re-enrollment every year.

 Open enrollment sessions will be held at all facilities beginning on May 1.  See chart below for locations, dates and times.

Annual Education

The Annual education window is open in UMMS U. Here is what you need to know:

  • Access your education through HR Connections.  No extra password needed since you are logging in through a secure access point.
  • Once on the HR Connections page, look for the UMMS U link in the center of the page.  There are demos there to help you navigate, as well as the “My Training” tab to get you started on your journey to complete your required annual education.
  • The window closes on July 1, 2018.  All staff must complete the mandatory education requirements by the deadline!  If you have problems or questions, contact Kathy Freund, ext.  5936.

Welcome, New Team Members

 

Front row: Alicia Ramsay, Nicole Coleman, Tanika Wilson, Amber King and Seketha Lewter. Back row:  Keith Britt, Shelby Shufelt, Matthew Slater, Nakisha Fitchett, Christopher McCaffery and Steven Pringle.

Please join Human Resources in welcoming the following new team members to UM Shore Regional Health:

  • Keith Britt, Receiving Clerk, Materials Management, SRH
  • Nicole Coleman, Staff Nurse (Supplemental), SRH
  • Nakisha Fitchett, Unit Secretary/Nurse Tech, MultiSpecialty Care. Shore Medical Center at Easton
  • Amber King, Medical Lab Assistant, Laboratory Services, Shore Medical Center at Easton
  • Seketha Lewter, Security Officer, Shore Medical Center at Easton
  • Christopher Mccaffery, Maintenance Supervisor, Plant Operation, Shore Medical Center at Chestertown
  • Steven Pringle, Staff Nurse, Cardiac Cath Lab, Shore Medical Center at Easton
  • Alicia Ramsay, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Comprehensive Rehabilitation Services, Shore Medical Center at Easton
  • Shelby Shufelt, Medical Lab Assistant, Laboratory, Shore Medical Center at Easton
  • Matthew Slater, Security Officer, Shore Medical Center at Dorchester
  • Tanika Wilson, Nurse Tech, MultiSpecialty Care, Shore Medical Center at Easton

Rewards & Recognition Website Is Offline Until May 7, 2018

The UM SRH recognition website is temporarily unavailable while the Rewards and Recognition program is launched across the UMMS system.  It will be re-launched during hospital week (May 6 – 12).

Rewards and recognition are important parts of the UMMS culture, which values and appreciates all  dedicated employees and the impact they have each and every day on patients and their families.

The program structure, look and feel will not change.  You will still be able to recognize others and be recognized using the same initiatives that you do today.

What does enterprise wide mean?  You can now use the employee directory to recognize employees across the UMMS system.  You could receive points, for example, from someone in another hospital with whom you have worked with on a team.  Corporate employees who work in all UMMS hospitals can now receive recognition from any hospital in the system.  It truly extends the ability to recognize system wide!

This ability to extend recognition across the UMMS System further demonstrates UM M Shore Regional Health’s commitment to Be a Part of Something Greater.  We appreciate your continued support in making the UM SRH Celebrate with HEART program a success!